Update 30 Jun 2020

Today is the last day of the month. Next week the lockdown will be over and its back to work, kind of anyway.

I’ve spent the last 12 days working on the Sam Kuen Do (SKD) manual and updating the learning syllabus. Right now we are at version 2.0. By next week we will move on to version 3.0. The challenge is how to learn more without having to have to learn too many things (expansive yet compact).

SKD version 3.0 brings some new learning areas such as :-

a) 3 different methods for generating power using the lower body

b) How to use (a) while stepping using Leung Yi Bo

c) Improved ways to learn the three basic force models

d) Incorporating (c) into the corresponding three strikes

e) Revamped 6-blocks and variations (7-blocks, 8-blocks, 9-blocks)

f) New strikes – linking three floating palms and linking two chopping strikes

Working on SKD has helped me to reorganize the teaching of the 8-step Health Form. I have not posted any videos to learn it step-by-step because when I tried making videos then I found out that what I took for granted, how I learned it, is not that easy to put across in self-learning videos. In fact, it could be confusing.

One example is from the topic of the 2 4 points. In Grandmaster Wei Shuren’s original pictures from his book on the 22-form the points are not even labelled – see below :-

In my post here (pictures also reproduced below) I labelled where the 2-point and 4-point is for ease of reference. But as you can see below the 2-point is the same whether the leading leg is the right leg or left leg and this can be confusing.

After deliberation I have come up with a simpler way to do this. For the purpose of learning the 8-step Health Form and for the teaching of how to step in SKD (yes, I am going to use this teaching tool in SKD also) we will just follow a straight forward, clear cut convention as shown below :-

So that’s the update. Now back to work on the SKD manual.

Why Emptiness

In today’s post I touched a bit on the training of emptiness.

The training of emptiness is actually simple and straightforward. But it can be maddeningly difficult to catch like trying to grasp water.

I guess this is where the fun of learning is. And when you get there it can be incredibly satisfying because you have something that most Tai Chi practitioners will never understand much less be able to acquire.

You will be able to have a glimmer of understanding why the first two generations of Yang family, Yang Luchan and Yang Chienhou, were said to have high level skill.

Clarity

This CB lockdown has one good thing going for me – time to practice in the morning before I start work at home.

For some reason, I think it is the way I have to focus on the tons of fine details that is embedded in the Tai Chi form as I move through it, that clears up the mind and help to perceive things more clearly.

Sometimes too clear a thinking is bad, cause I end up writing a post like “WTF” here.

Split Mountain Intent

In this new post here I give an example of the use of intent in Yang style Tai Chi training.

I also use a video of Grandmaster Wei Shuren demonstrating the power that can be cultivated from a sub-movement of the technique of Fair Lady Works Shuttles.

Hand Shapes Training

One topic that is not addressed enough in Tai Chi training is the use of hand shapes.

This topic is part and parcel of our training of Grandmaster Wei Shuren’s Tai Chi.

In the training of 8-step Health Form I am addressing this topic here by explaining how to train the hand shape to issue power.

The video below is a demonstration of the use of the palm hand shape :-

Wealth is Health

Wealth is health. Regular practice of Tai Chi is good for you. It gives gentle massage, trains your ability to concentrate and if you are game, use the techniques to play push hands, treat it like a game of physical mahjong if you like. But no gambling OK?

Today with short attention span trying to play a long form can be daunting. The way we play the long form will easily take at least an hour to go through.

OK, for me I can easily finish it in 10 minutes and still keep the principles intact at that speed. This is because I know the form well enough.

But sometimes when I don’t have the time or the space guess what I do? That’s right, I just practice one technique repeatedly and that’s my Tai Chi practice.

Or alternatively play part of a sequence of the form (whether from long form or short form) and if your form has the key principles in it you still get the same type of workout you would get from doing the long form.

For example, in Grandmaster Wei Shuren’s 22 form there are, well, 22 techniques. I can play just a few movements from it repeatedly and get a good workout.

Instead of 22 movements I just shorten it to 8 movements for one round or 14 movements for a 2 rounds sequence.

One Round Sequence

1) Beginning Posture

2) Left Wild Horse Parts Mane

3) Play Pipa

4) Repulse Monkey (left, right)

5) Grasp Sparrow’s Tail (left, right)

6) Cloud Hands

7) Single Whip

8) Abbreviated Closing

Two Rounds Sequence

1) Beginning Posture

2) Left Wild Horse Parts Mane

3) Play Pipa

4) Repulse Monkey (left, right)

5) Grasp Sparrow’s Tail (left, right)

6) Cloud Hands

7) Single Whip

8) Left Wild Horse Parts Mane

9) Play Pipa

10) Repulse Monkey (left, right)

11) Grasp Sparrow’s Tail (left, right)

12) Cloud Hands

13) Single Whip

14) Abbreviated Closing

One round takes about 4 minutes, two rounds 8 minutes. If you play it 6 times you get about 24 minutes worth of exercise.

Note – I actually play the form a bit faster here so it won’t put the viewer to sleep. I also exaggerated some movements so that the flavor looks more interesting.

Otherwise, the form will look very boring as the external movements makes uninteresting viewing though to those practicing the form the exciting part is actually the feelings that are running through the entire body as the mind is playing out the practice script mentally, you know the internal feel ………..