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Begin your mastery with our 3-step approach to learning the art.

a) Our teaching commitment

i) Step 1 – We tell you what you are learning; why you are learning it and how to learn it

ii) Step 2 – We teach you how to practice the principles using our forms. We also show you applications to help you understand how to do the forms properly

iii) Step 3 – We use push hands to train you how to respond dynamically using the forms you have learned

 

b) Your learning commitment

i) Keep an open mind to learning

ii) Commit necessary time to daily practice

iii) Be persistent to succeed

 

c) Lesson format

i) 1-to-1 private lessons, minimum once per week

ii) Conducted in English

iii) Teaching customized to learning ability of each student

 

We are located in the south-west region (Yew Tee) of Singapore. Lessons in the evenings week nights or whole day weekends.

Contact us today using the form below to take the first step towards your mastery of Tai Chi Chuan.

 

LogoBegin your journey to master Tai Chi by clicking here.

 

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Minimizing Training Problems

I wrote this post after reading a posting from SKD learning group member, AY, today.

Apparently, he is hurting his thumb and feeling uncomfortable from rebound shock when striking a pad (thanks to Sir Isaac Newton’s 3rd Law of Motion).

As usual, the same problem he faces applies to my Tai Chi students also.

The root cause of most training problems can be attributed to :-

a) Weak foundation in basics

b) Overdoing a movement to compensate for a weakness

c) Misunderstanding the principles

What the above means :-

a) Each style is configured to work a certain way in line with the way the style is designed.

If your basics is not performed properly then you would not be able to work and apply the techniques in the way it is intended to.

In SKD the way we hold the thumb minimizes injury when striking not just the pad but when playing with a live opponent. I’ve had my share of painful reminders why the traditional way of placing the thumb does not work.

For example, when we train moving at a faster pace such as shown in the video below we can end up bumping our thumb accidentally against the training partner’s arm especially when we strike and he blocks. When this happens the impact will jar our thumb from its holding position and this hurts.

b) When you are not ready to do something and you try to do it and you can’t get the result you may try to force your way through. You might then get the result but there will be a cost.

As an example, if you hit a pad you should be using whole body, relaxed movement. However, you may find that it is difficult to punch harder yet be relaxed at the same time. Yet, you desperately want to punch harder even though you are not ready.

But what the hell, you go ahead and do it anyway, thinking you know better. Your enthusiasm and eagerness is re-paid with rebound shocks that can give you headaches cause not correct is not correct no matter how you cut it. More so if you are punching a pad that is tied in front of a solid, unyielding post.

c) Paying close attention to basics, principles and core requirements can reap positive dividends. If you rush through the learning you can end up misunderstanding vital information.

For example, in SKD we say that the basic linear strike is like releasing an arrow? Why do we say this? When you examine all the information out there you will start to understand why the analogy of an arrow in flight is appropriate.

 

Summary – when your basics are in place some of the things that look inaccessible when you first started will become doable.

For example, some will claim that it takes a decade of study to be able to do Tai Chi fajing. I don’t think this is true. If it is true it is due to a number of factors, some of which is due to the student and some due to the teacher.

However, if both parties are willing to work towards it then there is no reason why the ability to fajing cannot be achieved earlier. In the video below the student has only learned for 3 years and he is attaining slowly but surely the ability to fajing.

Even then this is not as impressive. Some other students can do it after a few months of learning. They might not be as impressive but they can do it.

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Geyser Force

When you fajing do you truly connect to the ground and let it does its job?

Or do you use leg muscle to push against the ground to generate the power?

Below is a video showing how we train to connect to the ground without having to straighten the back leg to thrust against the ground to generate power.

Our rationale for this is that when you push your leg against the ground you are trying to use a stronger strength against a weaker strength. This does not fit the profile of Tai Chi as an art of using the soft to overcome hard.

Our reading of the principles of the Tai Chi Classics require us to let the opponent apply pressure on us so that we can borrow his power.

We then allow his power to connect to the ground at which point Newton’s 3rd Law of Motion comes into play, causing the opponent’s power to rebound back at him.

To allow this to happen we must relax so that the rebound force can move through our body swiftly with minimal impediment and maximum flow.

In this way when the force comes out it will be strong like a geyser discharging water forcefully into the air.

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Fajing Glimpse 2

How much time do you need to set up before you can fajing?

This question is important if you are playing with someone who does not stay still.

We approach the problem by learning how to fajing with minimal set up and shown below :-

This method relies on the use of intention because you can set up the conditions for fajing in your mind faster than if you actually need to get your body into position.

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Fajing Glimpse

Here’s a clip from a training session on 17 Sep 2018.

The question here is what do you do when your opponent relaxes his arms so that you cannot use his resistance against him.

You will find that its not easy to use the common method of fajing such an opponent unless you can get close enough to push his body instead of his arms.

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Begin to Learn Push Hands 4

This is the final video :-

Going a bit deeper into the nature of change depending on what the opponent gives you.

Below is a video I took years ago. This gives a demonstration of the various changes from the use of a basic push hands position.

This was taken on the fly in that we didn’t do any rehearsal or agreed on a fixed response. I just went with what was given to me by my student and thanks to him this came off well for a demo clip.

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Begin to Learn Push Hands 3

This is the third video :-

Some explanation on how to use the horizontal circle for application of techniques using Grasp Sparrow’s Tail as example.

In our push hands the understanding of change is important because we never know how the opponent will react. So it is important to us to really understand the various positions we find ourselves in when playing push hands.

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