First Day Blues

11 Apr 2019 was Day 1 of the SKD Challenge No. 2 which will run for three months.

The objective this time is to learn how to move between 6 blocks in a soft and flowing manner. Six movements do not sound like a lot but if you are not familiar with it then its a case of first day blues such as experienced by SKD member, M.

As with the Challenge No. 1 we will track members’ progress to see how they are getting on. M has performed admirably in Challenge No. 1 on the Yum Chui and even managed to make another breakthrough on Day 100. Kudos. M is made for SKD.

So the standard that I would like all SKD members to reach is as shown below :-

The end objective is to use the sequence to learn how to use the six blocks freely while defending and attacking whether with contact or without. Below is an example of how Yum Chui and other strikes can be integrated into the flow of the 6-blocks :-

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Internal Not

Yesterday was the 100th day of our SKD Challenge No. 1 for 2019. The entire challenge was focused on getting the first strike, Yum Chui, correct.

As a system SKD does not have to pretend to be an internal art. What purpose would this serve? Instead, we focus on getting movements and applications correct.

For example, a sub-component of Yum Chui is the pulling of one hand back as the other hand moves out in a strike. This movement is simple to do once you get it.

One important lesson that can be learned from the pulling movement is how to neutralize an opponent’s power by diverting it. Below is a clip showing member from Malaysia learning SKD :-

When you can do the pulling properly you can make the movement very small until its barely perceptible. You can then use it to neutralize on one side and issue on the other; the exact same principle of how to do the strike in Yum Chui.

The minimizing of movements to neutralize and issue once it is used in a “Tai Chi”-like context can make it seem internal but its not. If anything, it is just two distinct external movements refined to the point of seeming like one movement. No Chi, no breathing, no meridian circulation, no mumbo jumbo, just plain ole precise movements.

Quarterly Challenges

In another 20 days time the 100-Day Yum Chui Challenge will end.

After this the 100-Day Challenge will be converted to Quarterly Challenges so that we can have 4 challenges in a year. In this way we can master at least 80% of the core syllabus of SKD Level 1 by end of 2019.

Unlike the majority of challenges on the internet the Quarterly Challenges will run non-stop. Members who take part will push themselves to train daily. Even if they do not end up mastering the challenge, the daily training should at least leave them with a level of competence.

The serious member should also carry on with the 1st Quarter Challenge (previously known as the 100-Day Yum Chui Challenge). They should continue up to Day 300 for that extra edge in mastery.

SKD Member Training

We are nearly 3/4 of the way through the SKD 100 days Yum Chui challenge.

One of the SKD members from Australia came for training in Level 1 syllabus. The objective is to bring him up to speed on knowledge and skills so that a training group can be formed there.

Level 1 training covered the refinements and application of Yum Chui and Chau Chui, integration of techniques into a arm contact training platform, and 6-blocks (practice and application).

Some of the training is shown below :-

Yum Chui training

Arm contact training

6-blocks training

Watch all 31 short here.

Kicks Galore

Its kicks galore last week and this week as I taught my kicking method to a student. My kicking method is divided into two phases :-

a) External phase – this is described in the eBook “2-Dots : Six Learning Steps for Mastering Wing Chun’s Kicking Model ” and the verbal teaching of Master Leong Lin Heng

b) Internal phase – this is the method of using intent that is transmitted through the lineage of Grandmaster Wei Shuren

I started off my teaching with Kick No. 4 of the 4 kicks taught by Master Leong Lin Heng. I like this kick because it is so unexpected, so sudden and so weird that its difficult to guard against it even when it is executed at a slower pace. It is a good illustration of the usefulness of using kicks.

The next step is of course the principles of kicking. A good place to start reading about it is in the eBook 2-Dots mentioned above. But for my student it is not necessary to read as I have told him what he needed to know and trained him in it.

Our emphasis is to use it within push hands, not as a fixed, dead drill but as a live response when the appropriate situation arises whether when given or created. Now he has an extra area to focus on in push hands.

Some videos that are extracted from the lesson this week :-

First 100 Days Challenge for 2019

We will run the first SKD 100 days challenge for 2019 from 1 Jan to 10 Apr 2019.

The objective is to put in a serious, focused effort to master the first strike of SKD. Paul has already made good progress. All he needs now is one major push to master it.

You can see how Paul’s posture and body alignment has changed over a 9 month period below :-

The evolution of Paul’s body alignment – by using the same yellow line slant on each of the three photos we can see how his alignment progressed from totally out to just nice.

At the end of the 100 days we will make a 100 days video to see how members who take part have progressed.

To join the SKD learning group click here.