Basic Stance Formation

Here’s another Tai Chi essential that is part of our SKD training that I covered in our Zoom online training on 11 Jul 2020.

I’ve talked about traceability in the past. In this instance when we do the salute we are not just doing a greeting.

In the salute there are a few things to learn including how to form a basic high horse stance with attendant structural arch.
This arch forms the two leg bows which provide the foundation for the type of power found in Grandmaster Wei Shuren’s Tai Chi. In SKD I teach this concept as foundation habit.

With a proper leg structure we can move with proper upper body and lower body coordination, with good structural efficiency and economy of motion while keeping the body primed to generate power when required.

SKD Training Session 1

This morning we had the SKD online training on Zoom. I wanted to cover 3 topics but ended up covering only 1 topic.

Why this is so is because of our preferred method of teaching. Basically, there two ways to teach :-

a) Mass training – this way of teaching is more on getting everyone to do drills and having a fun time. If they really get it then its a bonus. If not, keep practicing

b) Focused training – this way is more for the serious, adult learner who knows what he is looking for. Its slower paced and the training is just as cerebral as it is physical.

In SKD we go for focused training. Its tougher to learn this way but you know exactly how to do it, why you are doing it and how you can use it.

Due to the massive amount of details it is not something you can latch onto right away. You still have to do your own training which is why we only have the training every two weeks to give you the time to practice.

To get the most out of the learning each participant should test their setup first. They should ensure that their entire body can be seen and give allowance for the ground in front to be captured in the frame as well. This allows me to check their stepping. I would recommend to use a webcam and a tripod to get the best angle.

The topic that I ended up covering today is the SKD salute. The salute is divided into three parts – opening movement, salute and closing. I had planned to run the class for 60 minutes but ended up doing it for 80 minutes and covering just the opening and salute.

Embedded in the SKD salute are the key principles that define the characteristics of Chinese martial art, at least the way I learned it from a few teachers.

From practicing the SKD salute we learned about efficiency of movement, the embedded possible applications, technique changes, setting up the body to generate power, etc. All this can be realized once the elements are adhered to and eventually put into play in subsequent practices.

The use of intent from understanding what we are doing can push us along the progress curve. Participants have seen for themselves that it is easy to just move the limbs but not so easy to move the limbs in a very precise and defined manner. This is why authentic Chinese martial arts can be said to be easy to learn but a bitch to train.

I missed out on recording the first half hour. However, I managed to record the last 53 minutes and have uploaded the video to the Slack workspace for The Tai Chi Solo Player.

The next training will be on 28 Jun 2020 at 8 am Singapore time. The full schedule is listed here.

Why Emptiness

In today’s post I touched a bit on the training of emptiness.

The training of emptiness is actually simple and straightforward. But it can be maddeningly difficult to catch like trying to grasp water.

I guess this is where the fun of learning is. And when you get there it can be incredibly satisfying because you have something that most Tai Chi practitioners will never understand much less be able to acquire.

You will be able to have a glimmer of understanding why the first two generations of Yang family, Yang Luchan and Yang Chienhou, were said to have high level skill.

Clarity

This CB lockdown has one good thing going for me – time to practice in the morning before I start work at home.

For some reason, I think it is the way I have to focus on the tons of fine details that is embedded in the Tai Chi form as I move through it, that clears up the mind and help to perceive things more clearly.

Sometimes too clear a thinking is bad, cause I end up writing a post like “WTF” here.

Split Mountain Intent

In this new post here I give an example of the use of intent in Yang style Tai Chi training.

I also use a video of Grandmaster Wei Shuren demonstrating the power that can be cultivated from a sub-movement of the technique of Fair Lady Works Shuttles.

Hand Shapes Training

One topic that is not addressed enough in Tai Chi training is the use of hand shapes.

This topic is part and parcel of our training of Grandmaster Wei Shuren’s Tai Chi.

In the training of 8-step Health Form I am addressing this topic here by explaining how to train the hand shape to issue power.

The video below is a demonstration of the use of the palm hand shape :-