2021 Day 1

Day 1 of 2021 was a quiet day.

Quiet day is good. Best thing to do in the morning is practice Tai Chi.

Just kept going with the form practice until I decided to stop. As my teacher said the objective is to practice.

Once done with the mentally intense practice of Tai Chi I thought of doing something more physical.

I haven’t touched the pole for a few months. So let’s get some practice in if only for short time.

Pole practice especially with the focus on just doing a few simple, repetitive techniques is good for practice speed, power and stamina.


We don’t work on one factor at a time. We work on all of them at the same time. Power is only useful if you are fast enough to use it.

And the ability to use power depends on whether you can get to the position you need to be when you need to be there.

That’s why in SKD we will at a later stage learn the long pole that Master Leong taught. It is a very short sequence but that’s good because we don’t have to burden our mind with trying to remember too many movements.

Application of Arm Swinging

The application of our 2nd arm swinging exercise is not always obvious.

However, it fits into our model of using long bridge. Below is an example of how this works :-

If we want to make the strike more powerful we can always add in the biomechanics of swallow, spit, float, sink.

When we train sitting down we are isolating certain key components to study. The sum of each key component can help to amplify our power.

Baseball Whip

In SKD we use a series of arm swinging exercises to learn how to use the body to move to execute techniques and issue power.

By learning to relax the arms to connect them properly to the back and the lower body our arms can deliver power in the manner of a baseball ball tied to the end of a whip.

SKD Single Whip

The genius of Grandmaster Nip Chee Fei is in identifying the essential elements of what works and using it for his own secret art of Pok Khek Kuen on which SKD is built.

An example of this is how GM Nip integrated the hook hand movement from the Single Whip technique into the Sao Chui strike to make it more effective.

Big Movement

This is part of our previous SKD session last Sunday.

The development of striking skills begin with bigger movements rather than smaller movements.

Why we begin with bigger movements is because it is easier to feel what we are doing. It is also easier to develop power through a bigger motion.

When we can feel what is happening, example how our arm is moving relative to the waist, how our legs is assisting the swing by coordinating the rise-fall movement that allows us to use gravity to accelerate down and use the same movement to come up etc, then its time to work on reducing the size of the movement.

A smaller movement is faster and is more useful when used for probing and entering.

SKD Short Talk on Kicking

Sometime ago in the pre-COVID 19 era (man, was it that long ago?) someone asked me about kicking in Tai Chi.

I am not demonstrating a Tai Chi kick here. This is also not an SKD kick. Its a kick I modified from one of the eight kicks in the Wing Chun dummy.

SKD Short Talk on Body Structure

In SKD we use Tai Chi body structure.

One of the principles of Tai Chi body structure is 含胸拔背 commonly translated as contain the chest, raise the back.

Here I give a demonstration of what this means and the implication in power generation.

I didn’t hit the dummy harder as I didn’t want it to fall over in case you are thinking that the power is not that strong.

I also kept the demo to this principle instead of involving the other principles so that we can view in isolation the workings of this principle.

SKD S7 Changes

At the basic level we use three strikes to simplify our learning.

However, having three strikes does not mean that we are limited in how we can apply them.

From the basic body posture we can also easily shift into the other techniques.

This allows us to easily expand our choice of response as we move up in our learning.

Here I am explaining how we can overcome an attempt to block our strike. We normally explore this as part of learning to understand our techniques.

Traditionally, the teacher will teach us some examples of how to apply the strategies of the art and leave it to us to look into it further.

There is no right or wrong answers, merely investigative questions such as won’t bringing my swinging arm up in the air open me up to a grappler to rush me and body lock me and so on.