Pieces of the Puzzle

A training sequence or kata or taolu seems like a linear sequence of movements. This is a simplified understanding of what it is.

In SKD the training sequence no. 1 is designed more like a puzzle palace in that what you see is not necessarily what you get. You learn the sequences. Then you learn how to decode them to extract the information that you are supposed to get.

Caveat – extracting the information requires you to practice until the movements are habitual, instinctive and flowing. When you reach here some of things you are supposed to learn will come out by themselves especially if you couple your learning with partner practice.

If we were to lay out everything we want a student to learn then he will end up with tons of drills to remember and this can be self defeating if the goal is to liberate him rather than enslave him. The question is how to learn less but end up with more instead of remembering a lot to learn less.

Nowadays when we go to supermarket and buy a chicken we are not given the intestines and internal parts, much less the curdled blood. However, in the days of past my mother would slaughter a chicken, keep the blood, curdle it to go with soup or porridge, then clean the intestines which is delicious deep fried or braised. Even the butt is eaten. Nothing is wasted.

In the SKD training sequence nothing is wasted. From the opening salute to the closing salute there is something to be learned. So when a students skips the salute part he is missing out on something.

In the salute part we put in the learning of the footwork pattern. There is the obvious stepping pattern. There is also the hidden pattern.

The obvious pattern is the side step, the step back and the lateral step. The pattern that is hidden is the step forward pattern and this is derived from the last three sequences. The logic here is that if you can’t get to the side position then you can’t step forward to continue your attack.

This begs the question – if we can side step how do we defend and attack with the hands. This is found in the fourth part where we work the Yum Chui, Chao Chui and Sao Chui if we want to use a long range aggressive response. We can continue the attacks using these three strikes or add in the movements from the three arm swinging drills from the second part.

If the preference is for a more sneaky, small frame movement type of response then the third part is where we should look. In this part we have finger thrust to the throat and groin slaps. The follow up here will be the 6-movements from the second part.

Everything learned from the first part to the fourth part is then used within the fifth and sixth parts.

The seventh part is where we can integrate our study of Kali into SKD. That’s one purpose. There is a secondary study that is hidden here. This study is an expansion of the use of Charp Chui as well as leading into the study of other things.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s